10 Reasons Why Flash Is Better Than Silverlight

…or, why it’s better to stick with the devil you know.

Please note that within 24 hours of publication of this article I made the response that follows the article. My sources of information on Silverlight were suspect and/or dated, and the points I made regarding Silverlight were full of misinformation. Thanks to all who responded for calling me out when I was as wrong as I was.

With the help of Tim Heuer, Microsoft employee and program manager for Silverlight, I am going to try to undo my mistake, and you will see an interview published here soon where Tim can address some of the issues regarding the benefits of Silverlight vs. other technologies.

I made a mistake, and would love to take this article back, but I am not going to run away from my error. My apologies for violating your trust with a poorly researched piece.

I’m human, and I will do what I can to rectify the mistake.

You know my feelings on this. HTML 5 provides web designers an interface for integrating rich content into their web pages. Why use a proprietary delivery format if you can use simple markup, and be assured that every user with a Mozilla or Webkit based browser will get the same experience?

Now obviously when it comes to games Flash is a mature platform that allows you to create something that plays in a web browser that standard markup wouldn’t let you do. That’s fine. I’m just saying that you have better options for embedding video and audio content into a web page.

Flash IS useful when it accomplishes something that standard markup wouldn’t allow you to do, and it will continue to be useful for the foreseeable future. Now we have Microsoft’s Silverlight, a competing product to Adobe’s Flash. Why should you care?

Well, you shouldn’t.

It’s bad enough having one proprietary plugin that is necessary for web browsing. We should be moving away from plugins and exploiting the intrinsic features of HTML 5.

Adobe Flash is a necessary evil. HTML 5 provides a way to move part of what Flash delivers to the web browser, which is moving in the right direction. Introducing yet another proprietary content delivery method into the web is the wrong direction.

Now that I’ve re-established how I feel about web content that deviates from standard markup and javascript, on to the 10 Reasons Why Flash Is Better Than Silverlight:

  1. Platform compatibility Flash officially supports Windows, Mac, Linux and Solaris. Silverlight supports Windows, Mac (only just recently too), and Linux, via Moonlight, an implementation started by the Mono Project, an open source effort to bring .NET frameworks to the linux platform, sponsored by Novell. Linux and Solaris desktops may be an inconsequential segment of the market, but the backbone of your internet runs on linux, BSD and Solaris servers. Exclusion of these platforms narrows your developer audience.

    Advantage: Flash

  2. Market penetration Adobe tells us that Flash is on 97% of the web browsers out there, which pretty much jives with the independent numbers I found while researching this article. Microsoft states that Silverlight is on one in four browsers, or 26% market penetration. Not sure about that, as some of the independent studies show it as low as 6%.

    Advantage: Flash

  3. 64 bit web browser support Adobe has an alpha version of Flash Player 10 for 64 bit linux systems, with the other platforms to come next when it’s done. Microsoft does not support 64 bit web browsers, and hasn’t said anything substantial, other than to remind people that 32 bit Internet Explorer works on 64 bit Windows machines.

    Advantage: Flash

  4. Supported image formats Flash supports almost every image format. Silverlight supports png and jpg only.

    Advantage: Flash

  5. Package delivery Flash is a compressed format, and is stored and delivered as a single file. Silverlight is not compressed, and it’s component files are stored and delivered individually. However, it’s been pointed out to me that you can store the Silverlight content on the server as a .zip file. As an afterthought. Touche.

    Advantage: Flash, barely

  6. Audio Flash’s ActionScript scripting language contains classes for generating and controlling audio. Silverlight does not support audio API’s, so you won’t be writing any audio events for the browser in Silverlight. You can’t even play back a .wav in Silverlight.

    Advantage: Flash

  7. Portability Flash files can be turned into Windows applications, and can be played on any host computer who’s operating system can run a standalone Flash player (read, almost all os’es). Silverlight can only be used in a web browser with a Silverlight plugin.

    Advantage: Flash

  8. Accessibility Flash contains a nice set of controls for hearing and vision impaired users. Captions, keyboard bindings for audio controls, and screen reader functionality make Flash a better choice for accessibility.

    Silverlight gives the ability to switch color schemes. That’s it.

    Advantage: Flash

  9. Client-server communication Flash implements the ability to have the client communicate with a remote server. Many useful applications come to mind. Silverlight allows you to do this, but only using .NET, which most internet servers aren’t running, being unix systems.

    Advantage: Flash

  10. 3D rendering Flash now supports 3D graphics rendering, which opens up a lot of possibilities for Flash game designers. Silverlight does not.

    Advantage: Flash

Now, if I wanted to, I could write an article on the 5 Reasons Why Silverlight Is Better Than Flash. The technology is not without merit. However, we already have a proprietary technology for delivering rich web content, and it exists on nearly 100% of the computers hooked up to the internet. Why is it we need a new one?

And why is it you would trust Microsoft to be the supplier? 20 years of Microsoft dominance on the desktop gave us an operating system standard that has an arcane administration interface, a mediocre desktop environment, and made you all accept it’s lack of security and stability as status quo. Because there was no competition, Microsoft was never forced to make a better product, and all you Windows users just had to take what they gave you.

This is who you want to entrust with control of your web standards? Really?

Ok, I’m opinionated. I have a platform to express my opinions, and they are generally backed up with solid experience or data to justify them. I am not always right, and I welcome anyone who disagrees with my thoughts on Microsoft’s Silverlight to begin that discussion in the comments section.

I don’t see the draw to Silverlight, and you better have a better selling point than “It’s Microsoft” if you want to win me over.

The above article is as written. The following in italics is an update dated 21Aug09 that I made in the comments section. Many of you will never read through all the comments, so I am adding it to the article. Please read before making your judgement in the comments section. Thank you.
-Michael Lankton

Obviously with this kind of negative reaction there are some serious issues with the content of my article this week.

I write a 1000 word article for this site, weekly. I’m not trying to reinvent the wheel, and I can’t be Ars Technica on a given topic with 1000 words.

This kind of reaction would not have occured over an opinion, so obviously my postition was seriously flawed. I apologize. I wrote a “10 things” blog article over a topic I lacked your expertise in, and you exposed my lack of knowledge in the area. This was not my intention, and I genuinely believed in the points I was advancing, but I was mistaken about a great deal it seems.

I will correct this with a properly researched comparison. Until then, please accept my apology for this article. I generally write on topics that I have a firm grasp of, but this week I went out on a limb with minimal research, and it bit me in the ass. I will not delete this article, because I feel that your comments are valid, and frankly I deserve it if I was so wrong in my assertions.

Thanks for straightening me out.

, , , ,

92 Responses to 10 Reasons Why Flash Is Better Than Silverlight

  1. JC August 20, 2009 at 3:37 pm #

    There’s a bit of misinformation here:

    1. Hosting Silverlight doesn’t require anything special on the server, you can host SL content on linux, bsd, solaris or any other server. Devs that want to create SL content on linux or mac systems can use the Eclipse plugin or Mono Develop.

    2. Silverlight adoption is currently at 34% according to riastats.com and grew 4% in the past 3 months. With that adoption rate it’ll top 50% next year.

    5. Silverlight content is zipped. You can rename .xap (the standard SL extension) to .zip and open it with any compression utility.

    6. Wav and mp3 are supported by Silverlight – and you can write your own codes to support absolutely any audio format. Here’s a synthesizer written entirely in Silverlight: http://community.irritatedvowel.com/blogs/pete_browns_blog/archive/2009/07/19/Silverlight-Synthesizer-Source-Code-_1320_-MediaStreamSource-Raw-Sound.aspx

    7. Silverlight applications can run stand-alone outside of the browser on any supported OS.

    8. Section 509 accessibility compliance is made possible in Silverlight by the same UI automation framework that’s used in Windows by WPF.

    9. Silverlight has an open TCP stack for client-server communication and also supports REST based transfers.

    10. Here’s a running demo of Silverlight’s 3d capabilities right next to Flash’s 3d. I can’t see any difference: http://www.shinedraw.com/3d-illusion/flash-10-vs-silverlight-3-perspective-3d/

    Just to clarify, 8 of your 10 points are incorrect. Maybe you wrote the article based on a previous version of Silverlight which could explain some of the disparity.

    I do agree with your overall point that it would be great if HTML 5 could take on more of the functionality that we currently use plugins for. I shouldn’t need to install a plugin to view streaming video or to produce those silly “shoot the monkey” ads.

    • Michael Lankton August 20, 2009 at 4:03 pm #

      Silverlight is a moving target, and if a newer, release version (don’t quote beta or alpha capabilities) of Silverlight does something I said it doesn’t, then I missed something and am incorrect.

      1. Yes, you can host Silverlight content on any platform. What I said in #9 was that client-server communication via Silverlight requires .NET. Anyway I was talking about client side on this bullet point.

      2. Good link. It still shows that 66% of web browsers do not have Silverlight installed, vs only 3% for Flash.

      5. Did not know that. I thought that the files for a Silverlight app used no compression whatsoever. Link?

      6. SL 2.0 didn’t support .wav. This thread indicates that people are still having issues with 3.0

      http://silverlight.net/forums/t/114237.aspx

      8. Is it Windows-only? If so, we’re excluding people. We want to include everyone, not just Windows desktops.

      10. When I included 3D I was talking about more than perspective shifts and transforms. Can Silverlight do this?

      http://www2.rasterwerks.com/game/phosphor/beta1.asp

      I appreciate your feedback. I was sure to be behind the times regarding Silverlight’s capabilities, because I do not develop Silverlight content, and like I said, Silverlight is a moving target right now with an ever increasing user and developer base.

      I guess you’d have to convince me why executing A in Silverlight is preferrable to using Flash, given all the discussion points above.

      Tell you what, I stand by my pro-Flash, anti-Silverlight stance for now, but in 6 months I’ll recompare the two.
      .-= Michael Lankton´s last blog ..Klipsch Sells Aragon And Acurus Brands =-.

      • Marcel August 21, 2009 at 11:01 am #

        “10. When I included 3D I was talking about more than perspective shifts and transforms. Can Silverlight do this?

        http://www2.rasterwerks.com/game/phosphor/beta1.asp

        Here’s an SL3 port of QuakeLight
        http://www.innoveware.com/ql3/QuakeLight.html

        • JC August 21, 2009 at 12:20 pm #

          This link:
          http://www2.rasterwerks.com/game/phosphor/beta1.asp

          Isn’t Flash, is it? It asked me to install something called shockwave player which I hadn’t heard of before.

          • Michael Lankton August 21, 2009 at 5:39 pm #

            You are absolutely right. Quite a large oversight on my part, and certainly not acceptable to drag Shockwave into a discussion of Flash vs Silverlight. Retracted, and apologies.

      • Mike Hole August 21, 2009 at 12:22 pm #

        Urm is it just me or didn’t that rasterworks link just install shockwave on my pc and not use flash? oops just read the comment above.

      • Bill Reiss August 21, 2009 at 12:30 pm #

        5. XAP files have been around since Silverlight 2 beta (over a year and a half?) this isn’t a new feature.

        10. I went to this link and it asked me to install Shockwave. We need to be compating straight Flash and Silverlight here. I may be wrong but from what I understand Flash only supports perspective transform out of the box.

  2. JC August 20, 2009 at 4:37 pm #

    There’s a bit of misinformation here:

    1. Hosting Silverlight doesn’t require anything special on the server, you can host SL content on linux, bsd, solaris or any other server. Devs that want to create SL content on linux or mac systems can use the Eclipse plugin or Mono Develop.

    2. Silverlight adoption is currently at 34% according to riastats.com and grew 4% in the past 3 months. With that adoption rate it’ll top 50% next year.

    5. Silverlight content is zipped. You can rename .xap (the standard SL extension) to .zip and open it with any compression utility.

    6. Wav and mp3 are supported by Silverlight – and you can write your own codes to support absolutely any audio format. Here’s a synthesizer written entirely in Silverlight: http://community.irritatedvowel.com/blogs/pete_browns_blog/archive/2009/07/19/Silverlight-Synthesizer-Source-Code-_1320_-MediaStreamSource-Raw-Sound.aspx

    7. Silverlight applications can run stand-alone outside of the browser on any supported OS.

    8. Section 509 accessibility compliance is made possible in Silverlight by the same UI automation framework that’s used in Windows by WPF.

    9. Silverlight has an open TCP stack for client-server communication and also supports REST based transfers.

    10. Here’s a running demo of Silverlight’s 3d capabilities right next to Flash’s 3d. I can’t see any difference: http://www.shinedraw.com/3d-illusion/flash-10-vs-silverlight-3-perspective-3d/

    Just to clarify, 8 of your 10 points are incorrect. Maybe you wrote the article based on a previous version of Silverlight which could explain some of the disparity.

    I do agree with your overall point that it would be great if HTML 5 could take on more of the functionality that we currently use plugins for. I shouldn’t need to install a plugin to view streaming video or to produce those silly “shoot the monkey” ads.

    • Michael Lankton August 20, 2009 at 5:03 pm #

      Silverlight is a moving target, and if a newer, release version (don’t quote beta or alpha capabilities) of Silverlight does something I said it doesn’t, then I missed something and am incorrect.

      1. Yes, you can host Silverlight content on any platform. What I said in #9 was that client-server communication via Silverlight requires .NET. Anyway I was talking about client side on this bullet point.

      2. Good link. It still shows that 66% of web browsers do not have Silverlight installed, vs only 3% for Flash.

      5. Did not know that. I thought that the files for a Silverlight app used no compression whatsoever. Link?

      6. SL 2.0 didn’t support .wav. This thread indicates that people are still having issues with 3.0

      http://silverlight.net/forums/t/114237.aspx

      8. Is it Windows-only? If so, we’re excluding people. We want to include everyone, not just Windows desktops.

      10. When I included 3D I was talking about more than perspective shifts and transforms. Can Silverlight do this?

      http://www2.rasterwerks.com/game/phosphor/beta1.asp

      I appreciate your feedback. I was sure to be behind the times regarding Silverlight’s capabilities, because I do not develop Silverlight content, and like I said, Silverlight is a moving target right now with an ever increasing user and developer base.

      I guess you’d have to convince me why executing A in Silverlight is preferrable to using Flash, given all the discussion points above.

      Tell you what, I stand by my pro-Flash, anti-Silverlight stance for now, but in 6 months I’ll recompare the two.
      .-= Michael Lankton´s last blog ..Klipsch Sells Aragon And Acurus Brands =-.

      • Marcel August 21, 2009 at 12:01 pm #

        “10. When I included 3D I was talking about more than perspective shifts and transforms. Can Silverlight do this?

        http://www2.rasterwerks.com/game/phosphor/beta1.asp

        Here’s an SL3 port of QuakeLight
        http://www.innoveware.com/ql3/QuakeLight.html

        • JC August 21, 2009 at 1:20 pm #

          This link:
          http://www2.rasterwerks.com/game/phosphor/beta1.asp

          Isn’t Flash, is it? It asked me to install something called shockwave player which I hadn’t heard of before.

          • Michael Lankton August 21, 2009 at 6:39 pm #

            You are absolutely right. Quite a large oversight on my part, and certainly not acceptable to drag Shockwave into a discussion of Flash vs Silverlight. Retracted, and apologies.

      • Mike Hole August 21, 2009 at 1:22 pm #

        Urm is it just me or didn’t that rasterworks link just install shockwave on my pc and not use flash? oops just read the comment above.

      • Bill Reiss August 21, 2009 at 1:30 pm #

        5. XAP files have been around since Silverlight 2 beta (over a year and a half?) this isn’t a new feature.

        10. I went to this link and it asked me to install Shockwave. We need to be compating straight Flash and Silverlight here. I may be wrong but from what I understand Flash only supports perspective transform out of the box.

  3. MK August 20, 2009 at 3:57 pm #

    “Silverlight is not compressed, and it’s component files are stored and delivered individually.”

    Hi Michael, do you know what a zip file is:
    The ZIP file format is a data compression and archive format. A ZIP file contains one or more files that have been compressed to reduce file size.
    You can find more information here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZIP_(file_format)

  4. MK August 20, 2009 at 4:57 pm #

    “Silverlight is not compressed, and it’s component files are stored and delivered individually.”

    Hi Michael, do you know what a zip file is:
    The ZIP file format is a data compression and archive format. A ZIP file contains one or more files that have been compressed to reduce file size.
    You can find more information here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZIP_(file_format)

  5. John Dowdell August 20, 2009 at 7:26 pm #

    “We should be moving away from plugins and exploiting the intrinsic features of HTML 5.”

    uhm… why? ;-)

    Particularly considering the problems the WhatWG’s proposals are having, and how few consumers will support such work, shouldn’t such an assertion be substantiated, then tested for soundness?

    I think browser companies “should” make cross-browser functionality “first class citizens” in their “proprietary” HTML runtimes, myself. Better that than trying to each individually copy something they don’t have the chops to fully understand (cf the codecs imbroglio, the streaming realization, the punt on captioning, and so on).

    jd/adobe
    .-= John Dowdell´s last blog ..Opening the Flash file format =-.

  6. John Dowdell August 20, 2009 at 8:26 pm #

    “We should be moving away from plugins and exploiting the intrinsic features of HTML 5.”

    uhm… why? ;-)

    Particularly considering the problems the WhatWG’s proposals are having, and how few consumers will support such work, shouldn’t such an assertion be substantiated, then tested for soundness?

    I think browser companies “should” make cross-browser functionality “first class citizens” in their “proprietary” HTML runtimes, myself. Better that than trying to each individually copy something they don’t have the chops to fully understand (cf the codecs imbroglio, the streaming realization, the punt on captioning, and so on).

    jd/adobe
    .-= John Dowdell´s last blog ..Opening the Flash file format =-.

  7. Sam August 20, 2009 at 7:28 pm #

    Michael Lankton,
    Your opinionated views don’t show any advantage of Flash over Silverlight. Silverlight 3 (and this is not beta) matches or beats Adobe’s Flash in every aspect you talk about above. Besides writing an article without getting your facts straight, you conveniently ignore the .NET developer base (over 6 million) that is beginning to adopt Silverlight now. Silverlight 3 and Expression Blend 3 introduced new techniques like SketchFlow which helps designers build rich user experience oriented applications. Abobe has nothing to match that. Silverlight and Moonlight support almost all major platforms on this planet. Sorry dude, but your article has very little merit.

  8. Sam August 20, 2009 at 8:28 pm #

    Michael Lankton,
    Your opinionated views don’t show any advantage of Flash over Silverlight. Silverlight 3 (and this is not beta) matches or beats Adobe’s Flash in every aspect you talk about above. Besides writing an article without getting your facts straight, you conveniently ignore the .NET developer base (over 6 million) that is beginning to adopt Silverlight now. Silverlight 3 and Expression Blend 3 introduced new techniques like SketchFlow which helps designers build rich user experience oriented applications. Abobe has nothing to match that. Silverlight and Moonlight support almost all major platforms on this planet. Sorry dude, but your article has very little merit.

  9. Tom August 21, 2009 at 1:24 am #

    @Michael Lankton:

    1. Platform compatibility: Silverlight supports all major client-based OSes like Windows, Mac and Linux. Since both Silverlight and Flash are client-side technologies, lets not get into server-side OSes. Microsoft’s developer audience is dominating and frankly, the market share for Sun Solaris is 0.3% across all domains in July 2009. What developers are you referring to here? In time, there are going to be 4-6 million developers writing Silverlight applications both on the internet and the Intranet (where Microsoft’s IIS rules). How can we predict this? Well, because Silverlight doesn’t require you to learn anything new if you already a .NET developer and are familiar with XML/HTML declarative style of coding.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    2. Market Penetration: Flash has a head start of about 10 years in this market. They had NO competition of any kind in RIA space. Silverlight is only in version 3 right now (Moonlight in 2). In 2 years since it was first released – a penetration of nearly 33% is very encouraging and promising. Flash has no room to grow – just market share to lose.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    3. 64-bit browser support: Let’s face the reality, how many people besides business users really use 64-bit browsers? Even so, a Silverlight application will work on 64-bit machines.
    Advantage: Tie

    4. Supported image formats: This is no big deal – converting a gif or bmp to jpg and png is piece of cake. What advantage are we talking about here? For end-users it doesn’t matter!

    5. Package Delivery: Both use compressed files.
    Advantage: Tie

    6. Audio Formats: Are you kidding me Michael? Read this before you make accusations. In addition to supporting mp3 and wma formats: http://silverlight.net/getstarted/silverlight3/default.aspx
    Advantage: Tie

    7. Portability: Silverlight 3 applications can run as stand-alone applications on Windows and Mac. Moonlight may support such a feature on Linux.
    Advantage: Tie

    8. Accessibility: Your arguement with another user who commented this out is fruitless. Since it runs on Windows and Mac, it is not limited to Windows. Besides, Windows has > 90% of the market share in desktops. Mobile space is not yet in the picture althought RIMM has announced plans to include both Flash and Silverlight in their phones.
    Advantage: Tie

    9. Client-Server communication: Lets put it this way, Apache’s market share is about 47% today and IIS is about 24%. Microsoft may not have the upper hand on the Internet server market yet, but its climbing that ladder quickly. For businesses on the other hand, IIS servers rule. Silverlight applications for businesses are going to thrive.
    Advantage: Flash for now… watch out though

    10. 3D rendering: Again, go read:
    http://silverlight.net/getstarted/silverlight3/default.aspx
    Advantage: Tied

    Now, let me introduce some new categories here:

    11. Designer experience: Silverlight has with it tools like Expression Blend that provides: SketchFlow – a superior design technique for both designers and developers.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    12. Learning curve: Microsoft developers don’t need to learn new languages to write Silveright applications. Regular .NET languages like C# or VB.NET can do the trick along with XAML which is like XLM/HTML. ActionScript and Flex are additional headaches and not really Object-oriented programming languages.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    13. Touch support: Silverlight 3 supports touch screens and touch based input. Not aware of Flash supporting touch based input.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    14. Multi-page applications and SEO support: Silverlight 3 applications support the browser back button and work like normal HTML, PHP or ASP.NET pages. SEO support is also very good now. Don’t know if Flash supporting multi-page applications!
    Advantage: Silverlight

    • Marcel August 21, 2009 at 11:15 am #

      Actually point 6, support for audio formats, is not a tie.

      With the SL3 Raw AV pipeline, Silverlight can easily support a wide variety of third-party codecs. Audio and video can be decoded outside the runtime and rendered in Silverlight, extending format support beyond the native codecs.

      People already made Silverlight/Moonlight compatible codecs for Theora and Vorbis, and there’s even one that renders flv files.

      Can Flash do that?

  10. Tom August 21, 2009 at 2:24 am #

    @Michael Lankton:

    1. Platform compatibility: Silverlight supports all major client-based OSes like Windows, Mac and Linux. Since both Silverlight and Flash are client-side technologies, lets not get into server-side OSes. Microsoft’s developer audience is dominating and frankly, the market share for Sun Solaris is 0.3% across all domains in July 2009. What developers are you referring to here? In time, there are going to be 4-6 million developers writing Silverlight applications both on the internet and the Intranet (where Microsoft’s IIS rules). How can we predict this? Well, because Silverlight doesn’t require you to learn anything new if you already a .NET developer and are familiar with XML/HTML declarative style of coding.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    2. Market Penetration: Flash has a head start of about 10 years in this market. They had NO competition of any kind in RIA space. Silverlight is only in version 3 right now (Moonlight in 2). In 2 years since it was first released – a penetration of nearly 33% is very encouraging and promising. Flash has no room to grow – just market share to lose.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    3. 64-bit browser support: Let’s face the reality, how many people besides business users really use 64-bit browsers? Even so, a Silverlight application will work on 64-bit machines.
    Advantage: Tie

    4. Supported image formats: This is no big deal – converting a gif or bmp to jpg and png is piece of cake. What advantage are we talking about here? For end-users it doesn’t matter!

    5. Package Delivery: Both use compressed files.
    Advantage: Tie

    6. Audio Formats: Are you kidding me Michael? Read this before you make accusations. In addition to supporting mp3 and wma formats: http://silverlight.net/getstarted/silverlight3/default.aspx
    Advantage: Tie

    7. Portability: Silverlight 3 applications can run as stand-alone applications on Windows and Mac. Moonlight may support such a feature on Linux.
    Advantage: Tie

    8. Accessibility: Your arguement with another user who commented this out is fruitless. Since it runs on Windows and Mac, it is not limited to Windows. Besides, Windows has > 90% of the market share in desktops. Mobile space is not yet in the picture althought RIMM has announced plans to include both Flash and Silverlight in their phones.
    Advantage: Tie

    9. Client-Server communication: Lets put it this way, Apache’s market share is about 47% today and IIS is about 24%. Microsoft may not have the upper hand on the Internet server market yet, but its climbing that ladder quickly. For businesses on the other hand, IIS servers rule. Silverlight applications for businesses are going to thrive.
    Advantage: Flash for now… watch out though

    10. 3D rendering: Again, go read:
    http://silverlight.net/getstarted/silverlight3/default.aspx
    Advantage: Tied

    Now, let me introduce some new categories here:

    11. Designer experience: Silverlight has with it tools like Expression Blend that provides: SketchFlow – a superior design technique for both designers and developers.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    12. Learning curve: Microsoft developers don’t need to learn new languages to write Silveright applications. Regular .NET languages like C# or VB.NET can do the trick along with XAML which is like XLM/HTML. ActionScript and Flex are additional headaches and not really Object-oriented programming languages.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    13. Touch support: Silverlight 3 supports touch screens and touch based input. Not aware of Flash supporting touch based input.
    Advantage: Silverlight

    14. Multi-page applications and SEO support: Silverlight 3 applications support the browser back button and work like normal HTML, PHP or ASP.NET pages. SEO support is also very good now. Don’t know if Flash supporting multi-page applications!
    Advantage: Silverlight

    • Marcel August 21, 2009 at 12:15 pm #

      Actually point 6, support for audio formats, is not a tie.

      With the SL3 Raw AV pipeline, Silverlight can easily support a wide variety of third-party codecs. Audio and video can be decoded outside the runtime and rendered in Silverlight, extending format support beyond the native codecs.

      People already made Silverlight/Moonlight compatible codecs for Theora and Vorbis, and there’s even one that renders flv files.

      Can Flash do that?

  11. Jeff Cantwell August 21, 2009 at 3:23 am #

    A web browser, by its fundamental nature, is a browser that shows normally static content. Overtime we’ve butchered this to allow dynamic content BUT controlled.

    The browser itself is poorly equipted to run applications!! Google realize, the actual browser dev teams realized this, its only superficial tech reporters like yourself that dont.

    HTML5 will never evolve fast enough to define specs for application delivery over the web, and it shouldnt.

    Simple content deliver YES but application deliver NO!! Thats what plugins and proprietary browser upgrades will accomplish!

    The purpose of your article is completely lost on me and you shouldn’t talk about things that you really have no clue about!

  12. Jeff Cantwell August 21, 2009 at 4:23 am #

    A web browser, by its fundamental nature, is a browser that shows normally static content. Overtime we’ve butchered this to allow dynamic content BUT controlled.

    The browser itself is poorly equipted to run applications!! Google realize, the actual browser dev teams realized this, its only superficial tech reporters like yourself that dont.

    HTML5 will never evolve fast enough to define specs for application delivery over the web, and it shouldnt.

    Simple content deliver YES but application deliver NO!! Thats what plugins and proprietary browser upgrades will accomplish!

    The purpose of your article is completely lost on me and you shouldn’t talk about things that you really have no clue about!

  13. Barbara Ling, Virtual Coach August 21, 2009 at 10:05 am #

    But how do you REALLY feel? :)

    Flash is something I need to teach myself. Got it for the kids this summer and they’re devouring it.
    .-= Barbara Ling, Virtual Coach´s last blog ..False Profits – Why you should NEVER trust online income earning claims =-.

  14. Barbara Ling, Virtual Coach August 21, 2009 at 11:05 am #

    But how do you REALLY feel? :)

    Flash is something I need to teach myself. Got it for the kids this summer and they’re devouring it.
    .-= Barbara Ling, Virtual Coach´s last blog ..False Profits – Why you should NEVER trust online income earning claims =-.

  15. James Carney August 21, 2009 at 11:44 am #

    Interesting post, and comments.

    I didn’t realize that Silverlight had come so far in version 3 – I might actually need to look into it.

  16. James Carney August 21, 2009 at 12:44 pm #

    Interesting post, and comments.

    I didn’t realize that Silverlight had come so far in version 3 – I might actually need to look into it.

  17. Bill Reiss August 21, 2009 at 12:47 pm #

    “Now, if I wanted to, I could write an article on the 5 Reasons Why Silverlight Is Better Than Flash. The technology is not without merit. However, we already have a proprietary technology for delivering rich web content, and it exists on nearly 100% of the computers hooked up to the internet. Why is it we need a new one?”

    Do you really think that Microsoft would be comfortable building their next generation of online applications on top of Flash? Just because something is ubiquitous doesn’t mean there can’t be room for a new upstart to come in and shake things up. Many Flash advocates are actually happy Silverlight has entered the game because it’s forcing Flash to innovate. Competition is good. Is the main problem that this competition is coming from Microsoft?

  18. Bill Reiss August 21, 2009 at 1:47 pm #

    “Now, if I wanted to, I could write an article on the 5 Reasons Why Silverlight Is Better Than Flash. The technology is not without merit. However, we already have a proprietary technology for delivering rich web content, and it exists on nearly 100% of the computers hooked up to the internet. Why is it we need a new one?”

    Do you really think that Microsoft would be comfortable building their next generation of online applications on top of Flash? Just because something is ubiquitous doesn’t mean there can’t be room for a new upstart to come in and shake things up. Many Flash advocates are actually happy Silverlight has entered the game because it’s forcing Flash to innovate. Competition is good. Is the main problem that this competition is coming from Microsoft?

  19. timheuer August 21, 2009 at 1:41 pm #

    Michael, I was forwarded this link. I’d love to provide you with accurate information for your review. Your post (which still has uncorrected areas on it despite you indicating you would) is ill-informed on various levels. JC’s first reply points out most of the innacuracies in your article. If you’d like to get accurate information from the source, please feel free to reach out to me.

    -th
    PM, Microsoft Silverlight
    .-= timheuer´s last blog ..More Silverlight application themes and fixes =-.

  20. timheuer August 21, 2009 at 2:41 pm #

    Michael, I was forwarded this link. I’d love to provide you with accurate information for your review. Your post (which still has uncorrected areas on it despite you indicating you would) is ill-informed on various levels. JC’s first reply points out most of the innacuracies in your article. If you’d like to get accurate information from the source, please feel free to reach out to me.

    -th
    PM, Microsoft Silverlight
    .-= timheuer´s last blog ..More Silverlight application themes and fixes =-.

  21. timheuer August 21, 2009 at 3:07 pm #

    Michael — I felt the need to expand on JC’s comments and refute in full your post. I’m sorry, but your article is just not a comparison based on facts. http://timheuer.com/blog/archive/2009/08/21/silverlight-flash-comparison-based-on-bad-research-refuted.aspx

  22. timheuer August 21, 2009 at 4:07 pm #

    Michael — I felt the need to expand on JC’s comments and refute in full your post. I’m sorry, but your article is just not a comparison based on facts. http://timheuer.com/blog/archive/2009/08/21/silverlight-flash-comparison-based-on-bad-research-refuted.aspx

  23. freelance seo August 21, 2009 at 3:27 pm #

    Michael, kindly edit your Article. Really makes everybody annoyed after going through your article.
    .-= freelance seo´s last blog ..10 Major Seo Factors that affects website rankings(SERPS) =-.

  24. freelance seo August 21, 2009 at 4:27 pm #

    Michael, kindly edit your Article. Really makes everybody annoyed after going through your article.
    .-= freelance seo´s last blog ..10 Major Seo Factors that affects website rankings(SERPS) =-.

  25. Edgar August 21, 2009 at 3:39 pm #

    Wow! You should learn the technology before you bash on it. At least half of these points are just plain bogus, an indication that you rant without truly studying the subject material.

    On a side note I personally think that proprietary plug-ins are necessary to put pressure on advancing the standard. Furthermore even with HTML 5 the standards are severely lacking when it comes to supporting application development. Flash’s ActionScript 3 is vastly superior to JavaScript when it comes to writing applications. Silverlight takes that a step further by supporting multiple languages including my personal favorite programming language: C#. This alone is a huge advantage for Silverlight. Personally I’ve developed a number of web applications using HTML/JavaScript/CSS, Flex, and Silverlight. Hands down Silverlight has been the best development experience for me.

  26. Edgar August 21, 2009 at 4:39 pm #

    Wow! You should learn the technology before you bash on it. At least half of these points are just plain bogus, an indication that you rant without truly studying the subject material.

    On a side note I personally think that proprietary plug-ins are necessary to put pressure on advancing the standard. Furthermore even with HTML 5 the standards are severely lacking when it comes to supporting application development. Flash’s ActionScript 3 is vastly superior to JavaScript when it comes to writing applications. Silverlight takes that a step further by supporting multiple languages including my personal favorite programming language: C#. This alone is a huge advantage for Silverlight. Personally I’ve developed a number of web applications using HTML/JavaScript/CSS, Flex, and Silverlight. Hands down Silverlight has been the best development experience for me.

  27. Dan Wahlin August 21, 2009 at 3:43 pm #

    Michael,

    The amount of wrong and incorrect information in this post is stunning. It makes me wonder if you were paid to come up with bad info or something, that’s how off it is on some of your points. Have you built a single application in Silverlight or Flash or just heard rumors? I’m wondering…

    You might want to verify some of your facts first before writing a post. I have no problem if features in one platform are better in another (I’ve worked with Flash and Silverlight over the years) but at least take the time to do accurate research and get your facts straight. It doesn’t lend much credibility to you as a writer when you can’t even present accurate data.

    Point by point analysis.

    1. Agree. Flash covers more right now. However, Silverlight has supported Mac since V1 so that part of your point is inaccurate.
    2. Agree. Flash does have more penetration overall. What was your source by the way? You didn’t cite where you got your stats from.
    3. Agree.
    4. Agree. This one is correct although I’m not aware that Flash supports many more formats other than .gif which I’d argue many no longer use given .png capabilities.
    5. Completely wrong.
    6. Completely wrong.
    7. Completely wrong.
    8. Completely wrong.
    9. Completely wrong…geesh man…not even close.
    10. Silverlight only has perspective 3D at this point so if your Flash statement is accurate (not sure if I trust your statements at this point though) then I’d agree.

    So, you’re batting 50% at best. Not bad if you really don’t care about facts. I personally think the goal here was to increase traffic to the site, not to give an accurate depiction of Flash and Silverlight. Sad…

  28. Dan Wahlin August 21, 2009 at 4:43 pm #

    Michael,

    The amount of wrong and incorrect information in this post is stunning. It makes me wonder if you were paid to come up with bad info or something, that’s how off it is on some of your points. Have you built a single application in Silverlight or Flash or just heard rumors? I’m wondering…

    You might want to verify some of your facts first before writing a post. I have no problem if features in one platform are better in another (I’ve worked with Flash and Silverlight over the years) but at least take the time to do accurate research and get your facts straight. It doesn’t lend much credibility to you as a writer when you can’t even present accurate data.

    Point by point analysis.

    1. Agree. Flash covers more right now. However, Silverlight has supported Mac since V1 so that part of your point is inaccurate.
    2. Agree. Flash does have more penetration overall. What was your source by the way? You didn’t cite where you got your stats from.
    3. Agree.
    4. Agree. This one is correct although I’m not aware that Flash supports many more formats other than .gif which I’d argue many no longer use given .png capabilities.
    5. Completely wrong.
    6. Completely wrong.
    7. Completely wrong.
    8. Completely wrong.
    9. Completely wrong…geesh man…not even close.
    10. Silverlight only has perspective 3D at this point so if your Flash statement is accurate (not sure if I trust your statements at this point though) then I’d agree.

    So, you’re batting 50% at best. Not bad if you really don’t care about facts. I personally think the goal here was to increase traffic to the site, not to give an accurate depiction of Flash and Silverlight. Sad…

  29. Mike Hole August 21, 2009 at 3:45 pm #

    Just to shed some more (silver)light on the HTML 5 debate:

    http://blog.efvincent.com/concurrency-optimization-silverlight/

    Actually shows that Flash/Sl are close on FPS’s

    and it happens to be 3D :-“

  30. Mike Hole August 21, 2009 at 4:45 pm #

    Just to shed some more (silver)light on the HTML 5 debate:

    http://blog.efvincent.com/concurrency-optimization-silverlight/

    Actually shows that Flash/Sl are close on FPS’s

    and it happens to be 3D :-“

  31. Bill Reiss August 21, 2009 at 4:03 pm #

    Ok so you’ve updated the one about packaging by adding the following:

    “However, it’s been pointed out to me that you can store the Silverlight content on the server as a .zip file. As an afterthought. Touche.”

    An afterthought? The XAP file deployment is *the preferred method* of deployment in Silverlight and has been since the Silverlight 2 Beta just months after the initial Silverlight 1 release. I don’t even know how you would easily create a Silverlight 2 or 3 application that *doesn’t* package to a XAP file.

    Can you tell me how Flash still barely has an advantage on that point?

  32. Bill Reiss August 21, 2009 at 5:03 pm #

    Ok so you’ve updated the one about packaging by adding the following:

    “However, it’s been pointed out to me that you can store the Silverlight content on the server as a .zip file. As an afterthought. Touche.”

    An afterthought? The XAP file deployment is *the preferred method* of deployment in Silverlight and has been since the Silverlight 2 Beta just months after the initial Silverlight 1 release. I don’t even know how you would easily create a Silverlight 2 or 3 application that *doesn’t* package to a XAP file.

    Can you tell me how Flash still barely has an advantage on that point?

  33. Dudley August 21, 2009 at 4:16 pm #

    This article has to go down as one of the worst informed pieces of rubbish I have ever seen. What an amateur.

  34. Dudley August 21, 2009 at 5:16 pm #

    This article has to go down as one of the worst informed pieces of rubbish I have ever seen. What an amateur.

  35. Ely August 21, 2009 at 4:23 pm #

    This article is Epic. I needed a good laugh today.
    .-= Ely´s last blog ..Upgraded to BlogEngine.Net 1.5 =-.

  36. Ely August 21, 2009 at 5:23 pm #

    This article is Epic. I needed a good laugh today.
    .-= Ely´s last blog ..Upgraded to BlogEngine.Net 1.5 =-.

  37. mknopf August 21, 2009 at 4:24 pm #

    Michael

    Your argument is seriously flawed, you have failed in providing accurate information in which to compare and it only leads the reader to conclude that your opinion (and entire website) are not credible.

    Before you speak up do your homework, unless of course you actually want to be like the individuals at the recent Health Care Town Hall meetings who scream ridiculous fabrications in an attempt to prevent relevant debate over the topic.

    In addition, based on your Bio, it is obvious that you are not a developer and have never been one. You should leave the debate up to those who understand the technologies your comparing.

  38. mknopf August 21, 2009 at 5:24 pm #

    Michael

    Your argument is seriously flawed, you have failed in providing accurate information in which to compare and it only leads the reader to conclude that your opinion (and entire website) are not credible.

    Before you speak up do your homework, unless of course you actually want to be like the individuals at the recent Health Care Town Hall meetings who scream ridiculous fabrications in an attempt to prevent relevant debate over the topic.

    In addition, based on your Bio, it is obvious that you are not a developer and have never been one. You should leave the debate up to those who understand the technologies your comparing.

  39. Sam August 21, 2009 at 4:30 pm #

    Jaw-droppingly inept, even for those of us who prefer Flash over Silverlight. Silverlight guys – just letting you know, this guy doesn’t speak for me.

    Michael Lankton: when you try to cover up your profound lack of knowledge with blustering and evasion in the comments, it’s just slimy.

    You were completely and totally wrong on so many levels. Have the balls to admit it. The internet has a long memory.

  40. Sam August 21, 2009 at 5:30 pm #

    Jaw-droppingly inept, even for those of us who prefer Flash over Silverlight. Silverlight guys – just letting you know, this guy doesn’t speak for me.

    Michael Lankton: when you try to cover up your profound lack of knowledge with blustering and evasion in the comments, it’s just slimy.

    You were completely and totally wrong on so many levels. Have the balls to admit it. The internet has a long memory.

  41. Shawn Gavin August 21, 2009 at 4:45 pm #

    I will simply say that it kills me to read an article, not only filled with inaccuracies, but that comes across as a complete bashing against competition. I actually look forward to what Adobe has in store for Flash because of SilverLight. And lets not forget that a lot of what HTML5 is to become is being driven by current RIA technologies.

  42. Shawn Gavin August 21, 2009 at 5:45 pm #

    I will simply say that it kills me to read an article, not only filled with inaccuracies, but that comes across as a complete bashing against competition. I actually look forward to what Adobe has in store for Flash because of SilverLight. And lets not forget that a lot of what HTML5 is to become is being driven by current RIA technologies.

  43. ANaimi August 21, 2009 at 4:54 pm #

    You, my friend, are stupid.

  44. ANaimi August 21, 2009 at 5:54 pm #

    You, my friend, are stupid.

  45. Anon August 21, 2009 at 5:42 pm #

    Incredibly poor journalism here.

    If Flash does have any advantages over the competition, this type of trolling hides them instead of stating them.

    Terrible job.

  46. Anon August 21, 2009 at 6:42 pm #

    Incredibly poor journalism here.

    If Flash does have any advantages over the competition, this type of trolling hides them instead of stating them.

    Terrible job.

  47. Michael Lankton August 21, 2009 at 5:50 pm #

    Obviously with this kind of negative reaction there are some serious issues with the content of my article this week.

    I write a 1000 word article for this site, weekly. I’m not trying to reinvent the wheel, and I can’t be Ars Technica on a given topic with 1000 words.

    This kind of reaction would not have occured over an opinion, so obviously my postition was seriously flawed. I apologize. I wrote a “10 things” blog article over a topic I lacked your expertise in, and you exposed my lack of knowledge in the area. This was not my intention, and I genuinely believed in the points I was advancing, but I was mistaken about a great deal it seems.

    I will correct this with a properly researched comparison. Until then, please accept my apology for this article. I generally write on topics that I have a firm grasp of, but this week I went out on a limb with minimal research, and it bit me in the ass. I will not delete this article, because I feel that your comments are valid, and frankly I deserve it if I was so wrong in my assertions.

    Thanks for straightening me out.

  48. Michael Lankton August 21, 2009 at 6:50 pm #

    Obviously with this kind of negative reaction there are some serious issues with the content of my article this week.

    I write a 1000 word article for this site, weekly. I’m not trying to reinvent the wheel, and I can’t be Ars Technica on a given topic with 1000 words.

    This kind of reaction would not have occured over an opinion, so obviously my postition was seriously flawed. I apologize. I wrote a “10 things” blog article over a topic I lacked your expertise in, and you exposed my lack of knowledge in the area. This was not my intention, and I genuinely believed in the points I was advancing, but I was mistaken about a great deal it seems.

    I will correct this with a properly researched comparison. Until then, please accept my apology for this article. I generally write on topics that I have a firm grasp of, but this week I went out on a limb with minimal research, and it bit me in the ass. I will not delete this article, because I feel that your comments are valid, and frankly I deserve it if I was so wrong in my assertions.

    Thanks for straightening me out.

  49. timheuer August 21, 2009 at 7:10 pm #

    Michael – bravo for owning up. Again, the offer is there to have a conversation about the facts/capabilities of Silverlight if you want to, feel free to reach out.

    -th
    Microsoft

  50. timheuer August 21, 2009 at 8:10 pm #

    Michael – bravo for owning up. Again, the offer is there to have a conversation about the facts/capabilities of Silverlight if you want to, feel free to reach out.

    -th
    Microsoft

  51. Dave August 21, 2009 at 7:27 pm #

    Michael needs to either go to journalism school or stop writing. With this type of BS, he will simply devalue the quality of connectedinternet.co.uk .

  52. Dave August 21, 2009 at 8:27 pm #

    Michael needs to either go to journalism school or stop writing. With this type of BS, he will simply devalue the quality of connectedinternet.co.uk .

  53. Thomas Martinsen August 21, 2009 at 7:34 pm #

    You’re so wrong!!!

  54. Thomas Martinsen August 21, 2009 at 8:34 pm #

    You’re so wrong!!!

  55. Dhaval Faria August 21, 2009 at 7:53 pm #

    man ur soooo wrong.. I am nvr going to read ur stuff again :P

    get things clear before publishing anything. best of luck.
    .-= Dhaval Faria´s last blog ..Managed DirectX =-.

  56. Dhaval Faria August 21, 2009 at 8:53 pm #

    man ur soooo wrong.. I am nvr going to read ur stuff again :P

    get things clear before publishing anything. best of luck.
    .-= Dhaval Faria´s last blog ..Managed DirectX =-.

  57. Marc Roussel August 21, 2009 at 8:33 pm #

    One reason why Silverlight for MANY people is that it brings people that are developers with Microsoft tools to be able to work on the web. I would have never learn FLASH, SCRIPT, JAVA specially wich I hate so much, just because I sould go develop FLASH web thingy !

    So everything said, there’s something for everybody. If you don’t like red wine you may like white wine.

    There’s no comparison to do between FLASH and SILVERLIGHT so this article is useless.

    Use the platform you feel better to develop with and whoever is looking at your work by the window will see a similar result but don’t blame developers who comes from Microsoft background instead of ADOBE and the whole world of SCRIPTING, and JAVAING !

    Do your job, and we’ll do ours. There’s no need to battle in there. You seem the only one whishing to have a war but there’s none.

    Thank you.

  58. Marc Roussel August 21, 2009 at 9:33 pm #

    One reason why Silverlight for MANY people is that it brings people that are developers with Microsoft tools to be able to work on the web. I would have never learn FLASH, SCRIPT, JAVA specially wich I hate so much, just because I sould go develop FLASH web thingy !

    So everything said, there’s something for everybody. If you don’t like red wine you may like white wine.

    There’s no comparison to do between FLASH and SILVERLIGHT so this article is useless.

    Use the platform you feel better to develop with and whoever is looking at your work by the window will see a similar result but don’t blame developers who comes from Microsoft background instead of ADOBE and the whole world of SCRIPTING, and JAVAING !

    Do your job, and we’ll do ours. There’s no need to battle in there. You seem the only one whishing to have a war but there’s none.

    Thank you.

  59. ujeen August 21, 2009 at 8:37 pm #

    The most stupid and useless article I’ve ever read since working with RIA. And I found it thanks to timheuer. Thanks for showing how far somebody can be from understanding…

  60. ujeen August 21, 2009 at 9:37 pm #

    The most stupid and useless article I’ve ever read since working with RIA. And I found it thanks to timheuer. Thanks for showing how far somebody can be from understanding…

  61. John Graham August 21, 2009 at 9:29 pm #

    If you want to see an example of real 3d into Silverlight you can take a look at this:

    http://www.innoveware.com/quakelight.html

    So yea, unfortunately it is another flaw in your article.

  62. John Graham August 21, 2009 at 10:29 pm #

    If you want to see an example of real 3d into Silverlight you can take a look at this:

    http://www.innoveware.com/quakelight.html

    So yea, unfortunately it is another flaw in your article.

  63. Kris August 21, 2009 at 10:10 pm #

    Um as a coder and AV PROFESSIONAL myself- with over ten years experience in multimedia…I can say that this guy doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Flas is great , and ubiquitous, but Silverlight is more

  64. Kris August 21, 2009 at 11:10 pm #

    Um as a coder and AV PROFESSIONAL myself- with over ten years experience in multimedia…I can say that this guy doesn’t know what he’s talking about. Flas is great , and ubiquitous, but Silverlight is more

  65. UI Engineer August 21, 2009 at 10:28 pm #

    Wow…the author of this article needs a little more experience before making comparisons of software products he obviously knows nothing about. The title of the article should be changed to “The 10 Reasons Why I Cannot Get a Programming Job”

  66. UI Engineer August 21, 2009 at 11:28 pm #

    Wow…the author of this article needs a little more experience before making comparisons of software products he obviously knows nothing about. The title of the article should be changed to “The 10 Reasons Why I Cannot Get a Programming Job”

  67. ted August 22, 2009 at 5:28 am #

    I’ve worked with both Flash and Silverlight due to nature of my work environment. My company uses both Microsoft and Unix products. If you’re connecting with a lot of Microsoft products (asp.net, SQL server, Sharepoint) I would say it’s better to stick with Silverlight as the IDE and terminology will pretty much remain the same. If you use a lot of Open source products (PHP, Linux, Apache) then I would stick with Flash as a lot of people paved the way for combining these technologies. Silverlight has been implemented in a very quick pace, something to expect from multi billion dollar Microsoft. Flash has been around for a long time, ActionScript has matured and is a versitile language. It’s very dad that for the passed decade Microsoft hasn’t released any original technologies (not saying that Zune, Xbox and Silverlight are not good products). SharePoint is probably the only recent Microsoft technology that got me excited.
    I wonder how long Microsoft will be satisified with being 2nd place when developing new product lines. Bing and the Yahoo tie up is another classic example of Microsoft being 2nd place though this time it’s Internet Search, which I do think Google will dominate for a very long te as Google is a very original and innovative company.

    • Marc Roussel August 25, 2009 at 1:04 am #

      Long live to BING, man this search engine is the way I would like to search until I’m dead.

  68. ted August 22, 2009 at 6:28 am #

    I’ve worked with both Flash and Silverlight due to nature of my work environment. My company uses both Microsoft and Unix products. If you’re connecting with a lot of Microsoft products (asp.net, SQL server, Sharepoint) I would say it’s better to stick with Silverlight as the IDE and terminology will pretty much remain the same. If you use a lot of Open source products (PHP, Linux, Apache) then I would stick with Flash as a lot of people paved the way for combining these technologies. Silverlight has been implemented in a very quick pace, something to expect from multi billion dollar Microsoft. Flash has been around for a long time, ActionScript has matured and is a versitile language. It’s very dad that for the passed decade Microsoft hasn’t released any original technologies (not saying that Zune, Xbox and Silverlight are not good products). SharePoint is probably the only recent Microsoft technology that got me excited.
    I wonder how long Microsoft will be satisified with being 2nd place when developing new product lines. Bing and the Yahoo tie up is another classic example of Microsoft being 2nd place though this time it’s Internet Search, which I do think Google will dominate for a very long te as Google is a very original and innovative company.

  69. Anonymous August 25, 2009 at 4:16 am #

    Michael,

    With all due respect, I would like to say that Mindset is a dangerous thing. You have made up your mind, Flash is better than Silverlight. You’ll always go for Flash no matter how well we try to explain the advantages of Silverlight.
    But my opinion is, It would be better if you did a little homework on Silverlight before writing this article.

  70. Elisy August 25, 2009 at 6:57 am #

    .xap (zip) Silverlight package content can be generated on the server side using standard technologies. It allows dynamically creatable Silverlight applications that is more simple than create Flash applications dynamically.

  71. Ronny Randolph December 4, 2009 at 9:19 am #

    “Just to clarify, 8 of your 10 points are incorrect. Maybe you wrote the article based on a previous version of Silverlight which could explain some of the disparity.”

    Great pitch… Try Silverlight!!! it's 80% as good as flash.

  72. Kipster July 20, 2010 at 11:17 pm #

    It's “jibe…”, not “jive… with”.

  73. Hire .Net Developer November 30, 2011 at 8:01 am #

    Flash is better option to silverlight that i believe. Flash make much visualize your website, her some very nice points which are sharing for more knowledge about Flash.